Not on View

Untitled (Terminal Series)

Photo Credit: Rich Sanders, Des Moines

Untitled (Terminal Series)

Artist: Larry Bell (American, born 1939)
Date: 1968
Medium: Coated glass and rhodium plated brass
Dimensions:
Overall: 18 x 18 in. (45.7 x 45.7 cm.)
Credit Line: Purchased with funds from an anonymous California foundation and the Coffin Fine Arts Trust Fund; Nathan Emory Coffin Collection ofthe Des Moines Art Center, 1971.13
Accession number: 1971.13
Classification: sculpture
Copyright:Bridgeman Contemporary Artists' Service
In Collection(s)
Label TextChicago-born Larry Bell is considered one of the key artists to emerge out of the Los Angeles art scene in the mid-1960s. His work from this period is closely associated with the California Light and Space movement that included artists such as Peter Alexander, Robert Irwin, John McCracken and James Turrell. Like most of these individuals, Bell was interested in art as a purely sensory phenomenon that stemmed from the viewer’s interaction with the work. Removing all links to representation and narrative, Bell chose glass cubes as his format. He experimented with various densities and coatings for the glass, such as chromium, in an attempt to create an experience of transparency, reflection, light, and space for the viewer. Untitled (Terminal Series), like all of his cube sculptures, can be read as both self-contained, minimalist objects and as structures that draw in and distort their surroundings through their mirrored surfaces.
Exhibition History"Larry Bell," Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Feb. 22 - Apr. 3, 1983
Published ReferencesTHE NATHAN EMORY COFFIN COLLECTION, a portfolio of fifty selections from the collection, pub. by the Des Moines Art Center in 1981 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the death of Nathan Emory Coffin, b/w ill.

DES MOINES ART CENTER: SELECTED PAINTINGS, SCULPTURES AND WORKS ON PAPER, a catalog of selections from the permanent collection published in 1985, cat. ref. p.31 & 32, ill. pl.13, p.32
entirely unexpected