On View

Still Life: La Rose et la Parapluie (Still Life: The Rose and the Umbrella)

Photo Credit: Rich Sanders, Des Moines

Still Life: La Rose et la Parapluie (Still Life: The Rose and the Umbrella)

Artist: André Dunoyer de Segonzac (French, 1884 - 1974)
Date: ca. 1920
Medium: Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Overall: 15 x 18 in. (38.1 x 45.7 cm.)
Credit Line: Des Moines Art Center Permanent Collections; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Adler, 1966.38
Accession number: 1966.38
Classification: painting
Copyright:ARS
In Collection(s)
Label TextSInce the early years of the twentieth century, the painter and graphic artist Andre' Dunoyer de Segonzac has been an independent figure in the midst of art movements, and yet an artist who was fundamentally, unmistakeably, of the French school. As early as 1910, his individuality appreared in his exhibited works, setting him apart from the many "isms" of those revolutionary years. Within his individual style, which became firmly established by about 1920, there are just the echoes of Cezanne, Manet and Courbet that relate Segonzac to the main stream of French painting. His subjects are presented with a sense of both intimacy and order; his color both sensuous and controlled; and his technique painterly and fresh. Andre' Dunoyer de Segonzac was born in Boussy-Saint-Antoine, France, in 1884. He began his studies at the Paris Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1901, and by 1906 was working independently. In those years of artistic foment, he was with the independents from 1911, and a member of the Salon d'Automne from 1913. His early direct influences of Impressionism and Cubism were rapidly assimilated into his own style. Source: Bulletin, March 1967.
SignedA.D. de Segonzac (l,r oil paint)
Exhibition HistoryBrummer Gallery Inc., Jan. 1930
Published ReferencesDES MOINES ART CENTER: SELECTED PAINTINGS, SCULPTURES AND WORKS ON PAPER, Des Moines Art Center, 1985, ref. p.193

SELECTIONS FROM THE COLLECTION OF HIRSCHL & ADLER GALLERIES, Vol. II, pub. in N.Y., 1960, cat. no.90, ill. p.58

DMAC Bulletin, Mar. 1967, ill.
entirely unexpected